Authors who have influenced Alan.

Alan Jansen has been deeply influenced by P.G. Wodehouse, O. Henry, Roald Dahl and V.S. Naipaul to name a few.

 

O. Henry.

William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 - June 5, 1910), know by his pen name O. Henry, was an American short story writer. O. Henry's short stories are known for their wit, wordplay, warm characterization, and surprise endings. 

Imprisoned for some time on charges of embezzlement, Henry wrote many of his charming and wonderful short stories while in prison. In his post prison years, while a free man, Henry's produced a prolific writing period started in 1902, when he moved to New York City to be near his publisher.

While there, he wrote 381 short stories. Henry though was often not well received by the critics of his time.

 

P.G Wodehouse.

 

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse KBE, (15 October 1881 - 14 February 1975) was an English author and one of the most widely read humorists of the 20th century.

His works include the feather-brained Bertie Wooster and his erudite valet Jeeves, the ever enterprising Psmith, Lord Emsworth and Blandings castle, the lovable high born, but eternally broke lay-about Ukridge, the oldest member with stories about golf, and Mr Muliner's exaggerated and far-fetched tales ranging from bishops to moguls.

V.S Naipaul.

Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipul, (born 17 August 1932), is a Trinidadian Noble Prize winning British author renowned for his comic early novels set in Trinidad & Tobago, his bleaker later novels of the wider world, and his autobiographical chronicles of life and travels.

 

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl (13September 1916- 23 November 1990) was a British novelist of Norwegian descent, short story writer, poet, screenwriter, and fighter pilot.

His books have sold over 200 million copies worldwide. His awards for contribution to literature include 1983 World Fantasy Award for life achievement, and Children's Author of the Year from the British Book Awards in 1990.

The Times placed Dahl 16th on its list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". Dahl's short stories are known for their unexpected endings and his children's books for their, often darkly comic content, featuring funny, yet villainous adult enemies of the child.